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Vancouver Symphony Orchestra Sept 22, 2018

Maestro Otto Tausk Otto Tausk was masterful in his animated conducting of the VSO this evening. A Dutch theme with music from the 20th century prevailed as Tausk began with the world premier of “Helix” by Edward Top. Brother pianists followed with a concerto for two pianos by Frances Poulenc, who wrote  the music  experience of the Paris Colonial Exposition in 1931.  Seated in the second row, I was intrigued by the closeness to a small harp; and later we wondered how the musician transported her instrument. After intermission, it was Stravinsky’s music from a ballet known as “The Firebird”. We were transfixed by Tausk’s movements; he smiled and gestured to his musicians, graciously acknowledging individuals and deftly used his fingers and fists to commence or close a musical passage. Apparently, Stravinsky visited Vancouver in 1965, a time when the city was largely unknown to the rest of the world. In these autumn concerts, Tausk makes his inaugural debut as music director for the VSO. Tausk conducts with physicality and reinforces our European roots. And yes, there was chocolate soufflé in our pre-concert meal!

Shores of Western Ireland

If you turn away from the renowned Cliffs of Moher and look in opposite direction, you see an equally compelling shoreline.

Source: Shores of Western Ireland

This Is 40: On the Virtues of Incremental Progress — Discover

Upon turning 40, screenwriter-turned-novelist Sean Carlin writes about friendship, learning, and the value of slow, gradual growth.

via This Is 40: On the Virtues of Incremental Progress — Discover

The Math Problem Diverting Women Out Of STEM Careers – Vocativ — Lueny Morell

http://www.vocativ.com/347023/the-calculus-confidence-gap-affects-women-in-stem-more/

via The Math Problem Diverting Women Out Of STEM Careers – Vocativ — Lueny Morell

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Canada: Institutional Impact New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 146 — SOTL Canada

Nicola Simmons, Editor Two years ago, SoTL Canada posted an invitation to submit institutional case study chapters to provide examples and evidence of the ways in which post-secondary institutions in Canada have developed and sustained programs around the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning that impact the institutional pedagogical climate. This special journal issue, The Scholarship […]

via The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Canada: Institutional Impact New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 146 — SOTL Canada

Care in Education

Teaching with Understanding and Compassion

Although our course focuses on the adult learner in the college environment, this recent book on teaching in K-12 sounds like it has some valuable writing for teachers in all institutional settings. The book publisher, Routledge, has books free to view online in the month of May. This title by Sandra Wilde grabbed my attention and I wanted to see if I could share the link on my blog.

Care in Education

How Teachers Use Social Media

How do teachers use social media as a teaching tool?

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/guidebook-social-media-in-classroom-vicki-davis?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=blog-social-media-guidebook-12-ways-image-repost

Marcus Buckingham on “authenticity”

Leadership is my topic in research and teaching. In teaching I discovered that students cling to the traditional mindset that once they identify their strengths and weaknesses, they put most of their energy into improving their weaknesses. Students without life or work experience may jump to the assumption that they need to change their personality. To help prevent such harmful leaps in thinking, I found the work by Marcus Buckingham helpful in my teaching development. This podcast is about 45 minutes and contains substantive comments regarding the strengths-based leadership development approach that originated with Buckingham .

http://www.entreleadership.com/podcasts/podcast-episode-73-put your strengths

Trends in Online Learning

In a Blog on the trends in open online learning Morrison (2013) suggests that social media enables collaboration among learners and she identified three social trends that will influence the education.

  1. Collaborating seamlessly means learners interacting without technological barriers, whether the teachers and learners are within an organization or at relating at  a  distance, tools such as “in the cloud” and “Google docs”   enable synonymous action. Teachers enable the collaboration through the following: ” peer projects, virtual study groups, and self-directed learning via their personal networks. though educators shouldn’t be far behind.”(Morrison, 2013, para. 5).
  2. Humanizing interactions through tools that capture user feedback and incorporates the feedback into the application, like SlideKlowd, Google Docs – Directions, and Twitter for Education, .
  3. Personalizing learning with technology that lets the student take control of their learning; MOOC platforms and Mozilla Badges, Linked In, and  Degreed facilitate life long learning.

References:

Morrison, D. (2013). Three Social Trends That Influence Education in 2014. In online learning insights: A blog about Open and Online Education Retrieved May 25, 2014 from http://onlinelearninginsights.wordpress.com/2013/12/13/three-social-trends-that-will-influence-education-in-2014/

 

Random Thoughts

http://therandomthoughts.edublogs.org/

I have followed Louis Schmier for almost 10 years; in his blog this educator writes on teaching and learning, always weaving current day realities into the classroom experience. The latest post on diversity links the terror of the past week to events on a US campus in 2014 and to the nature of diversity on our university campuses. I share his approach about the diversity of thinking and the need to do more listening in contrast to proclaiming what is right or wrong through words, attitudes, and sadly with bullets.